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United Nations Sustainable Development Goals

November 10, 2020

United Nations Sustainable Development Goals

The United Nations Sustainable Development Goals

The UN Sustainable Development Goals are a call for action by all countries – poor, rich and middle-income to promote prosperity while protecting the planet. They recognize that ending poverty must go hand-in-hand with strategies that build economic growth and address a range of social needs and job opportunities, while tackling climate change and environmental protection. More important than ever, the goals provide a critical framework for COVID-19 recovery.

United Nations Sustainable Development Goals

United Nations Sustainable Development Goals No. 1: No Poverty

United Nations Sustainable Development Goals 1 No Poverty

  • Economic growth must be inclusive to provide sustainable jobs and promote equality.
  • Globally, the number of people living in extreme poverty declined from 36 per cent in 1990 to 10 per cent in 2015. But the pace of change is decelerating and the COVID-19 crisis risks reversing decades of progress in the fight against poverty. New research published by the UNU World Institute for Development Economics Research warns that the economic fallout from the global pandemic could increase global poverty by as much as half a billion people, or 8% of the total human population. This would be the first time that poverty has increased globally in thirty years, since 1990.

United Nations Sustainable Development Goals No. 2: Zero Hunger

United Nations Sustainable Development Goals 2 Zero Hunger

The food and agriculture sector offers key solutions for development, and is central for hunger and poverty eradication.

The world is not on track to achieve Zero Hunger by 2030. If recent trends continue, the number of people affected by hunger would surpass 840 million by 2030.

United Nations Sustainable Development Goals No. 3: Good Health and Well-being

United Nations Sustainable Development Goals 3 Good Health & Well Being

Ensuring healthy lives and promoting the well-being for all at all ages is essential to sustainable development. Currently, the world is facing a global health crisis unlike any other — COVID-19 is spreading human suffering, destabilizing the global economy and upending the lives of billions of people around the globe.

United Nations Sustainable Development Goals No. 4: Quality Education

United Nations Sustainable Development Goals 4 Quality Education

Education enables upward socioeconomic mobility and is a key to escaping poverty. Over the past decade, major progress was made towards increasing access to education and school enrollment rates at all levels, particularly for girls. Nevertheless, about 260 million children were still out of school in 2018 — nearly one fifth of the global population in that age group. And more than half of all children and adolescents worldwide are not meeting minimum proficiency standards in reading and mathematics.

United Nations Sustainable Development Goals No. 5: Gender Equality

United Nations Sustainable Development Goals 5 Gender Equality

Gender equality is not only a fundamental human right, but a necessary foundation for a peaceful, prosperous and sustainable world.

There has been progress over the last decades: More girls are going to school, fewer girls are forced into early marriage, more women are serving in parliament and positions of leadership, and laws are being reformed to advance gender equality.

United Nations Sustainable Development Goals No. 6: Clean Water and Sanitation

United Nations Sustainable Development Goals 6 Clean Water & Sanitation

Clean, accessible water for all is an essential part of the world we want to live in.

While substantial progress has been made in increasing access to clean drinking water and sanitation, billions of people—mostly in rural areas—still lack these basic services. Worldwide, one in three people do not have access to safe drinking watertwo out of five people do not have a basic hand-washing facility with soap and water, and more than 673 million people still practice open defecation.

United Nations Sustainable Development Goals No. 7: Affordable and Clean Energy

United Nations Sustainable Development Goals 7 Affordable & Clean Energy

Energy is central to nearly every major challenge and opportunity.

The world is making progress towards Goal 7, with encouraging signs that energy is becoming more sustainable and widely available. Access to electricity in poorer countries has begun to accelerate, energy efficiency continues to improve, and renewable energy is making impressive gains in the electricity sector.

Nevertheless, more focused attention is needed to improve access to clean and safe cooking fuels and technologies for 3 billion people, to expand the use of renewable energy beyond the electricity sector, and to increase electrification in sub-Saharan Africa.

United Nations Sustainable Development Goals No. 8: Decent Work and Economic Growth

United Nations Sustainable Development Goals 8 Decent Work & Economic Growth

Sustainable economic growth will require societies to create the conditions that allow people to have quality jobs.

COVID-19 has disrupted billions of lives and endangered the global economy. The International Monetary Fund (IMF) expects a global recession as bad as or worse than in 2009. As job losses escalate, the International Labor Organization estimates that nearly half of the global workforce is at risk of losing their livelihoods.

Even before the outbreak of COVID-19, one in five countries – home to billions of people living in poverty – were likely to see per capita incomes stagnate or decline in 2020. Now, the economic and financial shocks associated with COVID-19—such as disruptions to industrial production, falling commodity prices, financial market volatility, and rising insecurity—are derailing the already tepid economic growth and compounding heightened risks from other factors.

United Nations Sustainable Development Goals No. 9: Industry, Innovation and Infrastructure

United Nations Sustainable Development Goals 9 Industry Innovation & Infrastructure

Investments in infrastructure are crucial to achieving sustainable development.

Inclusive and sustainable industrialization, together with innovation and infrastructure, can unleash dynamic and competitive economic forces that generate employment and income. They play a key role in introducing and promoting new technologies, facilitating international trade and enabling the efficient use of resources.

However, the world still has a long way to go to fully tap this potential. Least developed countries, in particular, need to accelerate the development of their manufacturing sector if they are to meet the 2030 target, and scale up investment in scientific research and innovation.

United Nations Sustainable Development Goals No. 10: Reduced Inequality

United Nations Sustainable Development Goals 10 Reduced Inequalities

To reduce inequalities, policies should be universal in principle, paying attention to the needs of disadvantaged and marginalised populations.

Inequality within and among countries is a persistent cause for concern. Despite some positive signs toward reducing inequality in some dimensions, such as reducing relative income inequality in some countries and preferential trade status benefiting lower-income countries, inequality still persists.

United Nations Sustainable Development Goal No. 11: Sustainable Cities and Communities

United Nations Sustainable Development Goals 11 Sustainable Cities & Communities

There needs to be a future in which cities provide opportunities for all, with access to basic services, energy, housing, transportation and more.

The world is becoming increasingly urbanized. Since 2007, more than half the world’s population has been living in cities, and that share is projected to rise to 60 per cent by 2030.

Cities and metropolitan areas are powerhouses of economic growth—contributing about 60 per cent of global GDP. However, they also account for about 70 per cent of global carbon emissions and over 60 per cent of resource use.

United Nations Sustainable Development Goals No. 12: Responsible Consumption and Production

United Nations Sustainable Development Goals 12 Responsible Consumption & Production

Worldwide consumption and production — a driving force of the global economy — rest on the use of the natural environment and resources in a way that continues to have destructive impacts on the planet.

Economic and social progress over the last century has been accompanied by environmental degradation that is endangering the very systems on which our future development indeed, our very survival depends.

United Nations Sustainable Development Goals No. 13: Climate Action

United Nations Sustainable Development Goals 13 Climate Action

Climate change is a global challenge that affects everyone, everywhere. It is affecting every country on every continent. It is disrupting national economies and affecting lives. Weather patterns are changing, sea levels are rising, and weather events are becoming more extreme.

Although greenhouse gas emissions are projected to drop about 6 per cent in 2020 due to travel bans and economic slowdowns resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic, this improvement is only temporary. Climate change is not on pause. Once the global economy begins to recover from the pandemic, emissions are expected to return to higher levels.

United Nations Sustainable Development Goals No. 14: Life Below Water

United Nations Sustainable Development Goals 14 Life Below Water

The ocean drives global systems that make the Earth habitable for humankind. Our rainwater, drinking water, weather, climate, coastlines, much of our food, and even the oxygen in the air we breathe, are all ultimately provided and regulated by the sea.

Careful management of this essential global resource is a key feature of a sustainable future. However, at the current time, there is a continuous deterioration of coastal waters owing to pollution, and ocean acidification is having an adversarial effect on the functioning of ecosystems and biodiversity. This is also negatively impacting small scale fisheries.

United Nations Sustainable Development Goals No. 15: Life on Land

United Nations Sustainable Development Goals 15 Life On Land

Nature is critical to our survival: nature provides us with our oxygen, regulates our weather patterns, pollinates our crops, produces our food, feed and fibre. But it is under increasing stress. Human activity has altered almost 75 per cent of the earth’s surface, squeezing wildlife and nature into an ever-smaller corner of the planet.

United Nations Sustainable Development Goals No. 16: Peace and Justice Strong Institutions

United Nations Sustainable Development Goals 16 Peace Justice & Strong Institutions

Conflict, insecurity, weak institutions and limited access to justice remain a great threat to sustainable development.

The number of people fleeing war, persecution and conflict exceeded 70 million in 2018, the highest level recorded by the UN refugee agency (UNHCR) in almost 70 years.

In 2019, the United Nations tracked 357 killings and 30 enforced disappearances of human rights defenders, journalists and trade unionists in 47 countries.

United Nations Sustainable Development Goals No. 17: Partnerships to achieve the Goal

United Nations Sustainable Development Goals 17 Partnerships for the Goals

The SDGs can only be realized with strong global partnerships and cooperation.

Inclusive Partnerships

A successful development agenda requires inclusive partnerships — at the global, regional, national and local levels — built upon principles and values, and upon a shared vision and shared goals placing people and the planet at the centre.

United Nations Sustainable Development Goals History

The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, adopted by all United Nations Member States in 2015, provides a shared blueprint for peace and prosperity for people and the planet, now and into the future. At its heart are the 17 United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), which are an urgent call for action by all countries – developed and developing – in a global partnership.

They recognize that ending poverty and other deprivations must go hand-in-hand with strategies that improve health and education, reduce inequality, and spur economic growth – all while tackling climate change and working to preserve our oceans and forests.

The UN Sustainable Development Goals build on decades of work by countries and the UN, including the UN Department of Economic and Social Affairs

1992 – Earth Summit

In June 1992, at the Earth Summit in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, more than 178 countries adopted Agenda 21, a comprehensive plan of action to build a global partnership for sustainable development to improve human lives and protect the environment.

2000 – Millennium Summit

Member States unanimously adopted the Millennium Declaration at the Millennium Summit in September 2000 at UN Headquarters in New York.

The Summit led to the elaboration of eight Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) to reduce extreme poverty by 2015.

2002 – World Summit on Sustainable Development

The Johannesburg Declaration on Sustainable Development and the Plan of Implementation, adopted at the World Summit on Sustainable Development in South Africa in 2002, reaffirmed the global community’s commitments to poverty eradication and the environment, and built on Agenda 21 and the Millennium Declaration by including more emphasis on multilateral partnerships.

2012 – UN Conference on Sustainable Development

At the United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development (Rio+20) in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, in June 2012, Member States adopted the outcome document “The Future We Want” in which they decided, inter alia, to launch a process to develop a set of SDGs to build upon the MDGs and to establish the UN High-level Political Forum on Sustainable Development.

The Rio +20 outcome also contained other measures for implementing sustainable development, including mandates for future programmes of work in development financing, small island developing states and more.

2013 – General Assembly Open Working Group

In 2013, the General Assembly set up a 30-member Open Working Group to develop a proposal on the SDGs.

2015 – Adoption of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development Agenda

In January 2015, the General Assembly began the negotiation process on the post-2015 development agenda.

The process culminated in the subsequent adoption of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, with 17 SDGs at its core, at the UN Sustainable Development Summit in September 2015.

2015 was a landmark year for multilateralism and international policy shaping, with the adoption of several major agreements:

Now, the annual High-level Political Forum on Sustainable Development serves as the central UN platform for the follow-up and review of the SDGs.

United Nations Sustainable Development Goals Support and Capacity-Building

Today, the Division for Sustainable Development Goals (DSDG) in the United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs (UNDESA) provides substantive support and capacity-building for the SDGs and their related thematic issues, as well as the Global Sustainable Development Report (GSDR)partnerships and Small Island Developing States.

DSDG plays a key role in the evaluation of UN system wide implementation of the 2030 Agenda and on advocacy and outreach activities relating to the UN SDGs.

In order to make the 2030 Agenda a reality, broad ownership of the SDGs must translate into a strong commitment by all stakeholders to implement the global goals. DSDG aims to help facilitate this engagement.